Who puts the bin out?


16/07/2018
by: Mary-Anne Bowring

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Who puts the bin out?

Although it may seem a trivial issue to some, for those who live in residential blocks, issues regarding refuse bins is a grey area. www.leaseholdersupport.co.uk explains all the information you need to diagnose the problem and take action. Normally the number of bins a residential development requires is set by the Local Authority, often as part of the grant of planning permission. The type of bins a Local Authority favours will usually depend on who their waste carrier is and what type of waste or refuse trucks are used in the locality of the development as it takes a different kind of refuse lorry to remove a Paladin bin as opposed to a Eurobin. The most common types of bins are: Paladin Eurobin Wheelie Bin Individual Bin Most Local Authorities have a waste control department who will meet on site to discuss refuse arrangements and determine which type of bin is suitable for a certain site.

Bins for larger developments At present, Local Authorities have a duty to remove domestic household waste without charge, however it is understood that certain Local Authorities are piloting schemes whereby residents will be charged or penalised if they create too much waste or do not recycle. As a result, most Local Authorities have introduced recycling schemes, some comprise a complex number of rubbish receptacles, each with a different purpose. There are two options for obtaining the necessary bins once the type has been agreed: Outright purchase or rental. Typically, Local Authorities have rented bins but it is becoming more commonplace that this is passed onto the private sector. It usually costs about 1/3rd of the cost of a bin to rent it. Site of the bin area The site for a bin area is usually a matter that is agreed at the planning stage of a new development. In the early days, difficulties may be incurred in gated developments as the right refuse truck needs to be equipped with a key fob.

The Local Authority may have concerns about the distance from the public roadway to a bin area, waste truck access, carrying distance, steps or other hazards. Number of collections Typically, residential collections in England have been weekly. However, there have been movements by some Local Authorities to collect less frequently in an attempt to encourage households to reduce waste and recycle. For high density developments, a meeting with the Waste Officer my result in it being agreed that collections can be more frequent, which may result in cost savings in either the purchase or hire of the relevant quota of bins. Waste that is not day to day items Most Local Authorities offer a collection and disposal service for bulky items such as furniture and old kitchen appliances.

Increasingly, waste disposal is becoming a more regulated activity and there are certain rules on disposal therefore many Local Authorities offer collection of some types of household items for free. Local Authorities generally will not collect building materials and rubble as this damages their refuse collection trucks. However, if it is bagged up, disposal of small amounts is free at a local refuse tip. Who put the bins out? Is just one of the subjects featured on leaseholdersupport.co.uk. Members can download 130 FREE fact sheets to help them deal with common issues affecting residential flats, and gain access to online tools and step by step guides to make managing your own block easier. For more information visit: www.leaseholdersupport.co.uk


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